ming movie reviews

in about 100 words or less

The Freshman (1925)

US 76m, B&W, Silent
Directors: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor; Cast: Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston, Brooks Benedict, James Anderson, Hazel Keener, Joseph Harrington, Pat Harmon

the-freshmanThe Freshman is a romantic comedy about a naive college student who is duped into believing that he has a chance at becoming the school’s most popular student. Attempting to make the football team to increase his chances of being the big man on campus, he unwittingly becomes the water boy. Unlike many early comic features which are often little more than a loosely constructed string of gags, Lloyd’s comic misadventures in The Freshman are well integrated into this charming and sentimental story (Klaus Ming November 2016).

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4 comments on “The Freshman (1925)

  1. Thomas Sorensen
    11/12/2016

    It is years ago I saw The Freshman and I do not remember too much of it. I suppose it was middle of the road for Lloyd.

    • Klaus
      11/13/2016

      I’m only now catching up on Lloyd’s body of work. I liked this one a whole lot.

  2. Chris, a librarian
    11/13/2016

    A great talent…So resourceful and creative.

  3. Klaus
    11/13/2016

    My wife recently went to Montreal for a long weekend and picked me up this on a Criterion Blu-Ray. A brilliant movie, and a very nice presentation. I think Llyod’s films are some of the most accessible silent films for modern audiences. While this is not my favourite Lloyd film, there are some pretty funny scenes and overall, a very entertaining movie.

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This entry was posted on 11/11/2016 by in 1920s, All, Unlisted and tagged , .
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